Wednesday, July 27, 2016

What's Going on in the Lab? Ferris Wheels!

Oh my! What have we been doing in the lab?
This was one of our favorite challenges last spring and in some summer school classes!
It's Ferris wheels!
Here's a great summer time STEM Challenge! Build a Ferris Wheel! It needs to be hexagonal and turn on a central axle! Will symmetry play a part in the final design?
This little challenge is part of a trio of challenges that are all about summer vacation theme park rides- Ferris Wheels, Roller Coasters, and Water Slides. These are perfect for summer or the month of August as kids head back to school!
You can see posts about the other challenges!
and 

In the meantime, this post is all about Ferris Wheels!

STEM Challenge: Build a Ferris Wheel! It needs to be hexagonal and turn on a central axle! Will symmetry play a part in the final design?
First, of all, do you know why Ferris wheel must be capitalized?
It's named after the inventor Mr. Ferris!
This happened in 1893 when the director of the Chicago World's Fair wanted a gigantic, unique, and amazing structure to rival the Eiffel Tower which had been the feature at the previous World's Fair in Paris. The director challenged a group of engineers to design something bigger and better and Mr. Ferris came up with the Ferris wheel. His was 250+ feet tall with 60 passenger cars. People paid fifty cents to ride the Ferris wheel which meant about a two revolution ride that took 20 minutes. Sadly, that original Ferris wheel was destroyed a few years later.

After we learned all this trivia about the first Ferris wheel my students were ready to build models.
Only they didn't have steel beams.
They had craft sticks and glue.

HELPFUL HINT: If you try this project you are going to need craft sticks! Don't be fooled by the dollar store variety- get the giant box- like this one:
They last forever, can be reused, and are much more economical than the dollar store packages!

STEM Challenge: Build a Ferris wheel! Kids had to work through making a hexagonal shape and then joining the two sides together. It was also really important that the two sides were symmetrical and joined properly.
We had to work through making a hexagonal shape and then joining the two sides together. It was also really important that the two sides were symmetrical and joined properly. Otherwise you ended up with a wonky wheel that would not turn. This happened a lot! But, one of the things I love about STEM is that kids make mistakes and then try something else. When their misshapen wheels were not turning they took the whole structure apart and were more diligent about laying those craft sticks in a good arrangement- but with each side matching.
Check the photo below for some wonkiness!

STEM Challenge: This task required using symmetry and matching the sides of the wheel. Groups that didn't line things  up correctly had wheels with sides that warped and this kept the wheel from turning! What a great learning experience!
Yep, I'm going to say that the above group didn't quite match up their wheel sides correctly.
Another big thing that kept happening is that  an axle had to go through the wheel. This meant the kids had to leave an opening! Some groups paid no attention to this minor detail and ended up with the center of their wheels being a stack of craft sticks, but no place to thread the axle. And, yes, they took that apart and started over. This was a fabulous challenge for persistence! In the photo below you can see a center area that worked perfectly. However, that wheel still has a mistake!
STEM Challenge: Build a hexagonal Freris wheel! Look closely at the photo. Can you spot the mistake? It's not a hexagon. That Ferris wheel has SEVEN sides!
Some of our mistakes were really interesting. Look closely at the photo above.
Can you spot the mistake?
It's not a hexagon. That Ferris wheel has SEVEN sides! But, y'all, look at it. It's pretty perfectly matched and it did work very well! How on earth did that team make a seven sided shape? Do you know how hard that is to do on purpose?

STEM Challenge: This was an exciting STEM challenge! Even though the Ferris wheels all looked very similar when finished it was still unique to each group. They all approached the task differently.
This was an exciting STEM challenge!
Even though the Ferris wheels all looked very similar when finished it was still unique to each group. They all approached the task differently. Some matched the wheel sides by laying them on top of each other. Some actually measured. Some just eyeballed it and hoped it worked.
This was definitely a trial and error challenge. Thank goodness hot glued craft sticks can easily be pulled apart!


So what have you been up to in Science class?
Coming Soon:
Pencil Boxes
Baked Potatoes

*Post may contain affiliate links!

Friday, July 22, 2016

5 Spectacular Books to Share (July)

Welcome back to my monthly Book Review Post! Today is devoted to several books that you might want to try! And one or two that I just didn't like!
There is no such thing as too many books.....check this blog post for some book reviews! Several are must-reads!
Throughout the post, for your convenience, you’ll find Amazon Affiliate links, which means Amazon compensates me if you purchase something through that link, at no extra cost to you. This helps keep this little blog running and helps fund give-aways!
Echo by Pam Munoz Ryan
This is the story of Otto and Friedrich and Mike and Ivy- all of their stories are woven together with a magical harmonica as the thread that binds them. The book opens with Otto stumbling upon 3 sisters in the forest and he quickly learns there is a prophecy and a mystery to solve. The other characters are added as you learn their background stories and how the harmonica fits into each. This book is just beautiful!

This book.
Wow.
I resisted reading it for about two months after I purchased it because it is 600 pages long.
But, y'all I read it in 3 days. It's a fast read and it's that good.
This is the story of Otto and Friedrich and Mike and Ivy- all of whom are woven together with a magical harmonica as the thread that binds them.
The book opens with Otto stumbling upon 3 sisters in the forest and he quickly learns there is a prophecy and a mystery to solve.
You then move into Friedrich's story which takes place in Germany during the Hitler years. Friedrich has a wine stain birthmark that factors into his story and he and his dad both work at the harmonica factory. When they have to flee Germany because of the death camps Friedrich's prize harmonica is sent in a factory shipment to America.
Then you meet Mike and his brother Frankie, orphans from Philadelphia. They are taken in by a widowed woman as part of her inheritance and they are chosen because of their musical abilities. Soon after moving to her home the mysterious harmonica is purchased for them. But, will she adopt them?
Last you meet Ivy, a child of Mexican heritage living in California. She plays the harmonica beautifully. Her story also becomes entwined with the war since the attack on Pearl Harbor has just happened. She and her family live on property owned by a Japanese family that have been sent to internment camps as suspected Japanese spies. Will they make it out? What about Ivy's brother who is fighting in the war in Europe? Will he survive?
And, in the end, the characters and their lives overlap in a heart-touching and beautiful way and in the midst of it all is the harmonica. You will love this book.

Calling Me Home by Julie Kibler
This book begins as the two main characters set off to travel to a funeral. The elderly character, Miss Isabelle, is being driven cross country by her maid, Dorrie. As the journey begins each of them reveals their life story and how the two are connected. As a young girl, the wealthy and somewhat spoiled Isabelle, had African American maids. This was in the 1930's when segregation still existed and the maids and workers in Isabelle's house had to return to their own homes before it got dark outside.

Calling Me Home begins as the two main characters set off to travel to a funeral. The elderly character, Miss Isabelle, is being driven cross country by her maid, Dorrie. As the journey begins each of them reveals their life story and how the two are connected. As a young girl, the wealthy and somewhat spoiled Isabelle, had African American maids. This was in the 1930's when segregation still existed and the maids and workers in Isabelle's house had to return to their own homes before it got dark outside. A sign at the edge of the city even declared, "Don't let the sun set on you in Shaleyville." (Incidentally, a sign that read these precise words once stood in a nearby city to my home here in Alabama.) As the journey continues Isabelle reveals that her house maid had a young son named Robert and Isabelle fell in love with him. The two became involved which led to a marriage and pregnancy and then Isabelle's family intervened. What follows is a complicated story of misunderstandings, betrayal, and fierce love between family members and friends. The ending was not what I expected and the reason for the funeral was a total surprise, as well. This is a fabulous book with an improbable story that will have you cheering for Isabelle and then crying with her. Dorrie's character is also developed as she tells her present-day story in alternating chapters. 


The Whistling Season by Ivan Doig
This book opens with Oliver replying to an newspaper ad for a housekeeper for his homestead in 1909 Montana where he is raising three boys. The mom has died and Oliver needs help. When Rose Llewellyn steps off the train she brings her brother Morris, called Morrie, with her and sets out for the homestead. In the next few weeks Rose sets out to scour the home from top to bottom, although she cannot cook. The three boys, Paul, Damon, and Toby attend school in a one-room schoolhouse and get into various escapades- including a hilarious backwards horse riding race

I read another book by this author, called Last Bus to Wisdom and loved it so much I added his other books to my list and was delighted when I found The Whistling Season at my favorite used book store. This book opens with Oliver replying to an newspaper ad for a housekeeper for his homestead in 1909 Montana where he is raising three boys. The mom has died and Oliver needs help. When Rose Llewellyn steps off the train she brings her brother Morris, called Morrie, with her and sets out for the homestead. In the next few weeks Rose sets out to scour the home from top to bottom, although she cannot cook. The three boys, Paul, Damon, and Toby attend school in a one-room schoolhouse and get into various escapades- including a hilarious backwards horse riding race. The story really begins when the school teacher runs away with a visiting preacher and Morrie becomes the teacher. Morrie, it seems, is a fount of information, a walking encyclopedia,  and handles the class -from first graders up to eighth graders in spectacular fashion. The chapter that tells about the class spelling bee is priceless. 
The students at this school all ride horses from their homesteads to get to school each day. One day Paul is sent to retrieve water from the well and this passage tells about his thinking: "There were round rims of shadow on the patch of prairie where the horses we rode to school had eaten the grass down in circles around their picket stakes. Perhaps that pattern drew my eye to what I had viewed every day of my school life but never until then truly registered. The trails in the grass radiated in as many directions as there were homesteads with children, all converging to that schoolyard spot where I stood.... everyone I could think of had something at stake at the school."
Truly profound.
In how many communities was this a simple truth? The school was the heart of the community, along with the children. The story continues with this:
"The mothers dispatched their hearts and souls out the door every morning as they sent waist-high children to saddle up and ride miles to school."

The writing style of this author is rich with details and his use of vocabulary will either be something you like or not. I love that he adds the details, even tiny things that don't really matter- except to help tell the story, albeit in vocabulary that is often too verbose.  (Like that last sentence!) However, I loved this book!


Hour of the Bees by Lindsay Eagar
The Hour of the Bees is about Caroline, called Carol, and her family. They have traveled to her grandfather's New Mexico sheep ranch to clean it out and sell it. This is to prepare for moving him to a nursing home as he has dementia. Twelve year old Carol is the babysitter for her small brother, Lu, and helps with a lot of the ranch chores and cleaning the house. Her half sister, Alta, is also with them and provides some comic relief. She is a typical surly, mouthy teenager.

The Hour of the Bees is about Carolina, called Carol, and her family. They have traveled to her grandfather's New Mexico sheep ranch to clean it out and sell it. This is to prepare for moving him to a nursing home as he has dementia. Twelve year old Carol is the babysitter for her small brother, Lu, and helps with a lot of the ranch chores and cleaning the house. Her half sister, Alta, is also with them and provides some comic relief. She is a typical surly, mouthy teenager. In the middle of this is Grandpa Serge. Carol has never met him until they arrive at the ranch and she is immediately intrigued with his story-telling about the old days of the ranch and her grandmother Rosa. The story Serge tells has some magical, mysterious qualities about a tree, bees, and Rosa's travels.
I really wanted to love this book, but I did not find it to be a mesmerizing page-turner. I skimmed a lot of it- trying to get to the good parts.
I did find this one gem near the end- The family has returned to their home and Carol goes shopping with her middle-school friends. It seems they simply must have new backpacks for the coming school year and the latest fad is a messenger bag. Carol buys one only because all her friends do. Here's the quote I found to be so true: "My friends each buy a messenger bag, so I fork over the money, too. We pose in the store mirrors, our bags slung over our shoulders and I think of the sheep at the ranch, how they would stand so close together they blurred into a single puffball. If one of them stood just a little taller, his head would poke out of the collective wool. Then anyone could see him. A coyote. A hawk. Dare to poke your head up, dare to stand out from the crowd, and you risk being gobbled up."
This was an okay book and you should definitely try it, just to see what the hype is about. You may love it!

Teacher Misery by Jane Morris
This one is just the most hilarious and heart-breaking ever! Written by a high school English teacher it consists of short chapters dealing with all the drama teachers have to face. This includes notes from students demanding that it is okay to turn in papers late because "it's beach weekend and I will be out of town" and parents that make extreme excuses to get their kids out of trouble.

This one is just the most hilarious and heart-breaking ever! Written by a high school English teacher it consists of short chapters dealing with all the drama teachers have to face. This includes notes from students demanding that it is okay to turn in papers late because "it's beach weekend and I will be out of town" and parents that make extreme excuses to get their kids out of trouble. Some of the sections are laugh out loud funny and all teachers have those stories to tell. Some sections are just hard to think about because they are so true and so awful. If you are a teacher you will totally get this book. If you are not a teacher you may not get it or it may really open your eyes to the job teachers have.
It's an easy and quick read! (By the way I blotted out a bad word that is on the cover of the book!)
And if you don't already, you should follow the Instagram account of this book's author: https://www.instagram.com/teachermisery/


Now, for two I tried that I just could not finish:


This one is a sequel to a book I loved. This one had NOTHING happening. After 100 pages I put it in my give away bag. I did enjoy the first one, but this one seriously had the same characters behaving differently and then they were just traveling and doing nothing. One hundred pages convinced me to move on to something new.

Oh, Judy Blume, how I love you, but not this book. I tried. I actually read about 125 pages and then could not keep the characters straight anymore. The book jumped around from person to person and I could not remember who was related to who and what their back stories were. There were just too many characters. I gave up.

Books are linked to Amazon- using my affiliate link- and if you don't already use Amazon Prime, you should! I mean stuff arrives in two days or less! It's amazing!

Go right now and join Doodlebugs Link up! Read what others are blogging about and BEST OF ALL join in with your own post. Five random things. That's all you write about. Or you can make themes like I do. Easy-peasy!





Friday, July 15, 2016

Things STEM is Not! (Summer Series #6)

Welcome back STEM and Science Friends!
This is the last week of my Summer STEM Series! But, it's a doozy.
I overheard this one day, "STEM is just fluff. All they do is play and build things!"
Grrrr.......
Then I started reading articles about STEM and realized there are still some misconceptions out there....this is similar to my Myths About STEM post, but here we go with some things that STEM is Not!!
STEM is a lot of things: Collaboration rich, fun, creative, full of team work, and so much more. But, there are definitely some things that STEM is NOT. STEM is not totally spontaneous, or just fluff, or cookie cutter projects. Here's a blog post explaining this and more!,,

STEM is a lot of things: Collaboration rich, fun, creative, full of team work, and so much more.
But, there are definitely some things that STEM is NOT. Let's take a look:

STEM Challenges are really easy, however some advance planning and prep is always needed. Throwing something together at the last minute might not be a great idea. Check this blog post for more about things STEM is not!
Before you panic about this statement, let me explain. You know how sometimes when you walk into your classroom you have no clue what you are going to do that day. C'mon, you know this happens. And then you throw something together and somehow it works. Well, STEM doesn't work like that!
Well, it can, but it's much more likely that you will need to think about a STEM activity with a day or two to plan for it. Gathering materials is necessary and maybe grabbing a parent volunteer or organizing things a little differently.
Can you throw something together on the spur of the moment?
Well, yes.
To be completely honest I invented a STEM challenge one day in about 5 minutes by just going through my cabinets and pulling out materials I thought would work. It's called Building Boats.
 True story.
HOWEVER, I have the advantage of being the STEM lab teacher and I have 43 cabinets, all full of 
stuff. If you really want to start with STEM I am here to help you, but do plan on thinking about the challenge, gathering materials, and getting your kids prepped for this adventure. They will take care of the rest!


STEM projects might use the same materials, but the final structures are very different. Expect students to use their own special talents and thinking to make their models unique! Definitely not cookie cutter projects! Check this blog post for more things STEM in NOT!
Let me explain again: A few years ago I had my third graders making "Moon Newspapers". It was a fabulous idea. Each student had a large piece of paper folded in half to resemble a newspaper and they had to have a title, like The Lunar Daily, and then articles about a whole list of moon events. It included drawings of the first moon landing and phases of the moon. You get it, right?
So, when these were finished we hung them in our hallway and they looked amazing.

But they all looked EXACTLY ALIKE.
Cookie cutter.
Here's the thing. STEM structures aren't like that. They are all different. Even when the groups have the exact same materials they will build something different.
And 9 times out of 10 what they build is completely different than what I expected. Take a look:
STEM Challenge: Toothpick towers! Students all have the same supplies, but they build completely different structures! Each group adds its own special ideas!

Those are all toothpick towers and use the exact same materials- but kids approach this task very differently. Definitely not cookie cutter (or playdough)!
Expect the unexpected and designs that will astound you.


STEM is not just about building structures! Actual science standards are followed in STEM Class! Check this blog post for more information!
Grrrr....."All they do in STEM class is just build stuff."
Let's knock that little statement right out of the park, okay.
I have science standards to cover. Yep.
Not only do I have science standards for my state, I also have the NGSS standards. I am sure you would like an example! Take a look:
Photos are from an exploration we complete in STEM ! It takes about three weeks to go through testing mystery powders and watching chemical reactions. It includes the amazing Insta-Snow and a fun little event called "Elephant Toothpaste".
Photos are from an exploration we complete in STEM! It takes about three weeks to go through testing mystery powders and watching chemical reactions. It includes the amazing Insta-Snow and a fun little event called "Elephant Toothpaste". It is not just about building. 
Here's another one:
This one is all about chemical reactions, too. And it also just happens to be a design project. Kids spend two weeks experimenting with pancake ingredients and then their testing data is use to make the ultimate pancake.
This one is all about chemical reactions, too. And it also just happens to be a design project. Kids spend two weeks experimenting with pancake ingredients and then their testing data is use to make the ultimate pancake. 
Conclusion: We don't just build stuff.

STEM Challenges are fun, but that is not all they are! It's not all play. It's a LOT of hard work, terrific thinking, problem solving extreme, and collaboration rich!
Here's another thing I have overheard about STEM.
"All they do is play and have fun. No wonder kids love it so much!"
Half of that is true. The other half is something STEM is NOT.
It's not just fun!
It's hard work.
It's thinking and planning and going through the steps of the engineering design process. It re-doing parts of your structure when it doesn't work. It's frustrating and aggravating when things don't work the way you expect and you have to start over. 
Does that sound like just fun?
Take a look:
STEM Challenges are fun, but they are also hard work. The team in the photo has learned that stacking those craft sticks in the center of their Ferris wheel is not going to work. They had to pry them apart and start over!
Kids are building a Ferris wheel. Total fun, right?
Well, it was fun, but the group in the photo forgot one tiny part of making that wheel. It needed an opening in the center for the axle on which the wheel turns.
They had to take it apart and start over.
They left an opening on the second try. Here's what happened next:
STEM Challenges are fun, but also frustrating. After starting over because they didn't leave a hole for the axle of this wheel, the team in the photo made the hole too large. They fixed this by closing the gap with pieces of craft sticks!
The opening was too large and the axle floated around in the hole and the wheel would not spin very well.
So, what did they do?
They added pieces of craft sticks around the opening to close the gap enough to make it work.
Totally problem solving at its best. Can't say it was all fun, however.
This happens daily in our STEM class. It's not all play. It's a LOT of hard work, terrific thinking, extreme problem solving!


STEM is about construction, building, designing, but we do more than that! We write all the time. Reflections, improvements, data tables, graphing, and more. Check this blog post for details!
And the last thing I have overheard or been directly told, "You are so lucky! Kids don't do any paper work so you have no grades!"
What?
Seriously!
We write in Every. Single. Challenge.
Remember that engineering design process I mentioned. We start with asking a question and then move into Imagining.
Kids write in this step! They also write about their plans and sketch ideas. They write about improvements and then write reflections at the end. Take a look:
STEM Challenges are about more than just building things! We write in STEM Class!
The top left Reflection says, "The hardest part was getting the strings even. We started over like three times." The top right is a graph plotting the results of bungee jumps (with Barbie dolls). The bottom left is a sketch of a Newton's Cradle. The bottom right has the question, "How will you make sure your strings are correct?" The student wrote, "Put a ruler to make sure it is correct."
The writing is often very simplified, but we still write.
We don't just build and play and have fun.
STEM is work.
And we love it!

Go check Doodlebugs for more Five for Friday Posts.
Don't forget to check back on most Wednesdays for my What's Going on in the Lab posts!


Friday, July 8, 2016

Let's Get Organized- 5 Easy Ways (Summer Series #5)

Welcome to my Summer Series! This is week 5! Wow, the response to this series has been spectacular and today's post may give you a few more ideas!
Today is a little peek inside how I organize materials and store things for STEM class!

STEM class uses a great variety of materials and these are stored and used repeatedly. Here's a great blog post giving you some ideas for organizing those materials!
Let me assure that I am not claiming any mystical powers for organizing and my ways may not work for you. But, on the other hand, these tips may help you or get you started!
So, let's get going!


First, and foremost, think about storing your materials in a logical format.

How to organize materials for STEM is the focus! Read more about storing things logically and keeping an inventory on this great blog post!
Let me explain. 
The lab I use has two entire 30 foot walls covered with cabinets- like a really big kitchen.
When I took over the lab all the cabinets and drawer spaces were full. They were full of a huge amount of things, but all of it had been put away in no specific way. Like, a drawer might have latex gloves, foil, and string in it. And a cabinet might have microscopes, balloons, and measuring tapes.
Get it? No order whatsoever! Given the amount of materials and storage spaces, I knew I was going to need to place things more carefully. So, first I emptied every cabinet and drawer and laid everything out on big tables --- in categories.
Then I started to put it all away carefully- in logical categories. Take a look at that photo above. That's my measurement cabinet. Everything in it concerns some form of measurement- measuring tapes and reels, thermometers, scales of all kinds, rulers, timers, calculators, and more. It makes so much sense! And it makes everything easy to find.
Unless you have ten tons of cabinets....which brings me to #2! Keep reading!

Tip 2 is to keep a written inventory!

A time saving tip if you have a lot of science or STEM materials- keep an inventory list! Check this blog post for more organizational tips!
At some point when I was putting things away, even though the storing was logical, I knew I had too much stuff! I knew I would never remember where all of it was. So, I started an inventory notebook.
It will seem extreme to you as you read this, but I promise, cross my heart, I have used this notebook repeatedly in the last few years and it has saved me so much time.
First, I labeled all the cabinets, and you can read about that in the next section. Then I listed the contents of every cabinet and drawer in my notebook- by cabinet or drawer number.
But, it occurred to me that this might not help. What if I needed something specific, like a needle. Where would that be? So, I also made an alphabetical listing. So, for needle I look at the N page and it tells me the number of the drawer where these are stored.
Oodles of time saved and a bonus of this is that I can also check to see how much of something I have before I purchase new things. It was time consuming to set up, but now it's a life saver.
So, is tip #3. Keep reading!

Tip 3 is to have a system for storage so you can find things quickly. All of my cabinets are numbered and the drawers are labeled.

Storing a lot of materials in a science or STEM class requires an organized system! Read more on this blog post!
This way I can find things so quickly. I can also tell kids- get an extension cord and they know how to locate this easily. Without the numbers and labels your organization or inventory list would be a tad useless or hard to use. Again, I arranged all these logically. Number 1 starts at one corner and the numbers just travel down one wall and then on to the other wall of cabinets. Drawers are numbered and labeled in case I later change what is inside them. So, have a number or labeling system to help you find things and I know you already know this and do it. The amount of materials in a STEM class makes it a necessity! And storing all of this is next up!

Tip #4 You cannot have enough storage bins.
SUPER Tip- You need plenty of bins and dishpans for storage in your STEM and Science class! This blog post has more organizational tips for you!
Seriously, every teacher already knows this, but let me tell you how I came to rely on plastic shoe boxes and dishpans so much. The very first STEM challenge we completed was a real learning experience for me! I never in a million years was prepared for us to NOT complete the activity in one class session. So, here I was at the end of class with half completed structures and used materials and somehow I needed a quick plan for what to do. So, I grabbed those blue dishpans and gave each group one. The kids stored their lab folders in the bins and their partially finished things and then the bins were stored on the shelves of their lab tables. The next week the teams just retrieved their bins and kept working. Try the Dollar Tree for dish pans, but if you need plastic shoe boxes they are better quality and less expensive at Wal Mart. And you will need these! Trust me on this!
(On a side note, one of the storage drawers in my lab has about 20 hot glue guns in it and you will need these, too! For a while I stored these in a large zip lock bag, but now I have too many for that!)


Tip #5 is about storing student work folders!
How do you store kids' work folders in our science or STEM class? This blog post has tips about this and more organizational ideas for you!
Whether you use folders, composition notebooks, or something else, you are going to need a place to keep these! I have a large metal shelf unit that holds all of our folders in plastic bins. Most of these bins came from the Dollar Tree. I have one for each teacher and the bin holds an entire class set of folders. We use folders because they take up less space than a composition notebook! 

Alright, STEM friends, there are some organization tips for you! Come back next week for the last post in this series!

Also, be sure to visit Doodlebugs Teaching for more Five for Friday link up posts!

Click on the images below to quickly get to the first 4 posts of this summer series!